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Showing posts from January, 2017

Boxelder bugs inside homes during winter

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist

With the recent mild weather we have experienced, some residents have been finding boxelder bugs and lady beetles in their homes. This is actually not unusual in the middle of the winter. These insects remain inactive as long as their hiding places in various wall voids, attics, and other nooks and crannies in and around buildings remain cold. However, if we receive mild, sunny temperatures, this can cause these overwintering insects to break their dormancy and become active. They then move towards the warmth inside the building where residents find them crawling around. Once active, they do not live much more than a few days to about a week.

Despite the circumstantial evidence; these insects are not laying eggs and reproducing indoors. All of the boxelder bugs or lady beetles that are seen indoors now entered buildings last fall. Unfortunately, there are not many good options for dealing with boxelder bugs and lady beetles at this time o…

Plight of the bumble bee: MN's threatened and endangered bumble bees

Elaine Evans, Extension Educator, Entomology/Pollinators/Bee Lab

Bumble bees are a common site in most Minnesota gardens, but some species have become increasingly uncommon, particularly over the last 20 years. Historically, Minnesota is home to 23 of North America’s 48 bumble bee species. Five species out of these 23 are in serious decline with severe loss of range as well as declines in numbers of bees. Another 3 species are in decline, though the losses are not as dramatic. This means that over one in three bumble bee species in Minnesota are vulnerable to decline. Although bumble bees may still be a common site in gardens, prairies, meadows, and fields, the bumble bee community you are seeing today is most likely a less diverse
group of bumble bees.

On December 11th, 2016, one of Minnesota’s declining bumble bee species, Bombus affinis, the rusty-patched bumble bee, was listed as an endangered species by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This is the first bumble bee to be given…

Caring for your amaryllis

Julie Weisenhorn, Extension Educator

Whether the first bulb or the fiftieth, there is high anticipation for the plant owner when the large, bright green bud emerges from a beefy amaryllis bulb! Amaryllis may be purchased as bare or planted bulbs, and are prized for their exotic trumpet-shaped flowers born on 1 to 2 foot leafless stalks or “scapes.” They add dramatic color to homes and gardens, and make wonderful gifts to gardeners from beginners to experts. Read more on the new Extension publication Growing and Caring for Amaryllis