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Extension > Yard and Garden News > Lawn Irrigation Survey and Water Saving Strategies

Monday, August 1, 2016

Lawn Irrigation Survey and Water Saving Strategies

The Metropolitan Council and University of Minnesota Extension are conducting a survey to assess irrigation practices throughout the 7-county Twin Cities Metropolitan Area.  This survey is part of a larger project with the ultimate goal of reducing water use in the home landscape.  You can help us by taking 10-15 minutes to answer a 30 question survey regarding your irrigation practices.  All survey participants will be entered into a drawing for 1 of 10 Visa Gift Cards ($50 value).  Additionally, we are conducting irrigation audits for many properties throughout the Twin Cities.  To have your home irrigation system audited, please complete the survey and indicate that you would like to receive a free audit.  To access the survey, please follow click the hyperlink below: 

RESIDENTIAL IRRIGATION SURVEY


Basic water saving strategies for home lawns      
   
Pay attention to the weather
During a Minnesota summer we may see heavy periods of rainfall followed by extended periods of drought. Homeowners with lawns should adjust irrigation practices accordingly. Operating irrigation controllers in manual mode is one way to monitor and cut down on water use, rather than using an automated schedule.
Select turfgrass species that use less water and can tolerate drought
Choice of grass species will impact irrigation requirements. Traditional turfgrass species for Minnesota include Kentucky bluegrass, perennial ryegrass, fine fescue, and tall fescue. The fescue species offer the best drought tolerance potential. 
Adjust irrigation programs to conserve water
To encourage rooting and drought tolerance, lawns should be irrigated infrequently (one time or less per week) with a sufficient volume of water (up to 0.5 inches). Set irrigation programs or sprinklers to water during the morning hours, because daytime irrigation is often lost through evaporation or wind deflection.    
Implement water saving technologies
Rain sensors connected to irrigation controllers are vital to conserving water. There’s no need for an automatic sprinkler system to be used when it’s raining.
Conduct an audit on your irrigation system
Irrigation auditing is one great way to conserve water.  Irrigation contractors will often perform this service for you if you have a contract with them.  Auditing an irrigation system includes three basic steps: 1) checking system components including sprinklers, valves and controllers, 2) conducting a performance test, and 3) programming the controller.  Visit the Irrigation Association website for more information on conducting an irrigation audit


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