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Showing posts from December, 2014

EAB is confirmed in Dakota County

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist

(The following information is taken from a December 23, 2014 newsletter from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture)


Jeff Hahn, Univ. of MN Extension
Photo 1: Ash trees marked for removal due to EAB.

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) confirmed an emerald ash borer (EAB) infestation in Dakota County. EAB was found in an ash tree in Lebanon Hills Regional Park in the city of Eagan, just north of the border with Apple Valley. The infested tree was detected through a routine visual survey of ash trees currently being conducted by the MDA. This survey is designed to find EAB in counties bordering the Ramsey and Hennepin County quarantine area.

Dakota County becomes the sixth county in Minnesota to confirm EAB. Additionally, EAB has also been found in Hennepin, Ramsey, Houston, Winona, and Olmsted (which was just confirmed this August) counties. These counties all have a state and federal quarantine established. The quarantine is in place…

Spotted lanternfly is now in U.S.

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist

A new invasive insect species from Asia, the spotted lanternfly, Lycorma delicatula, was discovered last month in Pennsylvania. Despite its name, this insect is not a true fly but is actually a type of planthopper which is related to aphids, leafhoppers, cicadas and similar insects. 


Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Dept of Agriculture
Photo 1: Spotted Lanternfly. Note spots on most of the wing and the lacey pattern on the wing tips.

A spotted lanternfly is a large insect, measuring about one and a half inches long. It is very distinctly colored and patterned. About 2/3 of the forewing is a light gray with small oval, black spots. The wing tips have a series of tiny rectangular black spots that give it a lacey appearance. The hind wings, when exposed, are brightly colored orange-red, black and white.

There are some native insects that could be confused with a spotted lanternfly, especially tiger moths and underwing moths which also can ha…

Mode of action of Neonicotinoids

Karl Foord, Extension Educator - Horticulture


Photo 1: Paired nerves

Photo 2: Neural synapse Insecticides

Insecticides can be characterized by the way in which they disrupt important biochemical functions. Many insecticides target the nervous system of insects by impairing the control of neural transmission. This can be done by disabling the system, and shutting it down. However, the majority of neural insecticides put the system in a continual state of ON giving the organism no opportunity to stop neural transmission. This results in uncontrolled and uninterrupted nerve firing. The insect that is exposed to such chemicals exhibits tremors, hyperactivity and convulsions. Sublethal doses of these chemicals can impair proper functioning behaviors such as flight orientation, and feeding while greater doses lead to a quicker death.

Normal neural transmission

A normal neural transmission proceeds down the nerve axon which splits into branches and eventually into smaller branches called dend…