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Showing posts from October, 2014

Millipedes in vegetables

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist


Jerry Wenzel
Photo 1: Despite the circumstantial evidence, the millipedes did not damage this carrot; they are taking advantage of previous damage.

A couple of home gardeners encountered millipedes in some of their vegetables during October. In one case they were in a few potatoes, in another instance they were infesting a carrot. There was concern whether the millipedes were attacking healthy vegetables. Fortunately, the millipedes were not causing damage in the garden. They have weak mouthparts and are only capable of feeding on decaying organic matter. It is possible for them to feed on plants that have already been damaged but they are not attacking healthy plants.

A 2012 research article in the Journal of Applied Entomology looked at the potential of millipedes and wireworms to attack carrots (also sweet potatoes). They found the presence of the millipedes was associated with wireworm damage to carrots. The millipedes themselves were no…

Don't worry about snowfleas

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist


Diane Peterson
Photo 1: These strange black lines are composed of large numbers of snowfleas

A couple of homeowners discovered an odd situation in their lawns during mid to late October. From a distance, they could see long, black lines in the grass. Upon closer inspection, they discovered that the black lines were actually due to many tiny insects. Examining the insects under magnification revealed that they were snowfleas, a type of springtail.

Springtails get their name because of their ability to jump. They feed on decaying organic matter as well as fungi, pollen, and algae. They are very abundant insects but because of their small size and that they are usually found in leaf litter, soil, and other generally hidden places, people do not usually notice them. Until, that is, they occur in large numbers.


Jeff Hahn, Univ. of Minnesota Extension
Photo 2: Snowfleas are most commonly seen on top of snow.

Snowfleas are particularly interesting b…

WCCO "Smart Gardens" Radio Show - October 18 & 25, 2014

Thanks for listening!

We aren't always able to answer everyone's texted questions on the air, so we try to post a few along with answers here in the Yard & Garden News blog. Remember that you can always visit the U of M Extension Garden website for loads of gardening resources. And feel free to share your gardening stories here by clicking on "Leave a comment" above.
Hope you join us and our host Denny Long every Saturday, 8-9am, on WCCO Smart Gardens and happy gardening!

American Bittersweet 'Autumn Revolution': Thanks to to listeners last week who shared via text the bittersweet cultivar 'Autumn Revolution' (Celastrus scandens 'Bailumn') developed by Bailey Nurseries, Newport, MN. This bittersweet has 'perfect' flowers - male and female parts on each flower - unlike the species bittersweet which has separate male and female flowered plants.

Overwintering perennials in containers: Perennials are best overwintered planted in the soi…

Turf and Bees: What's the buzz on pesticides in lawns?

By Ian Lane, Graduate Research Assistant

If you have been paying attention to the news lately, you know that bees have been making headlines. News outlets have done an amazing job of helping scientists sound the alarm on unsettling declines in bee pollinators. While we have good evidence for declines in honey bees and some of their cousins, the bumble bees, the cause of this decline is hard to pinpoint. Current thinking in the scientific community puts the decline down to a number of interacting factors, including reduction in stable food sources, introduction of bee diseases, and the irresponsible use of insecticides. While it's difficult to tease apart how these factors interact, we do have some good knowledge about how lawns fit into this theoretical framework.


Sam Bauer
Photo 1: White clover and dandelion can provide great early season forage for pollinators in lawns


Herbicides
Lawns are home to a number of weeds that are the bane of homeowners. While our gut reaction may be …

Forest Pest Workshops Scheduled in SE Minnesota

Jeffrey Hahn, Extension Entomologist

Rochester will host two workshops in response to the recent discovery of emerald ash borer (EAB) in Olmsted County. The first will be a Forest Pest First Detector workshop to be held on Wednesday, November 5th from 9 AM - 3:30 PM. The cost is $40 (lunch included). In addition to EAB, other pests to be discussed include gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, thousand canker disease, and Oriental bittersweet.



Jeff Hahn, Univ. of Minnesota Extension
Photo 1: Learn about emerald ash borer and other forest pests at a First Detector workshop.

The Minnesota Forest Pest First Detectors training program is designed to help identify the occurrence of Emerald Ash Borer and other forest pests in Minnesota. First Detectors are the front line of defense against likely infestations. Meeting, working with and educating the public about exotic forest pests are key activities of Forest Pest First Detectors.

Everyone is welcome to attend - even if you do not wish to…

Ground nesting BEES Colletes Part I: Building a nest

Karl Foord, Extension Educator - Horticulture

One of our early emerging vernal native bees is in the genus Colletes. These bees are commonly called plasterer bees, cellophane, or polyester bees. This is because the bee builds an underground nest and then paints/applies/lines her nest with a cellophane-like plastic material secreted from an abdominal gland. The bee applies this material with her two-lobe tipped tongue. This secretion helps protect the developing bees from fungal disease and acts as a waterproof barrier. It is so effective that ground-nesting species can occupy areas prone to flooding.

I photographed a Colletes bee digging a nest. The nest took several hours to dig which I videoed and then cut out much of the inactivity to create a 5 minute video.

One of today's landscaping rules-of-thumb is to cover bare soil with mulch to both prevent erosion and discourage weed encroachment. This makes sense, however should we reconsider this practice in light of our need to pro…